The Art of the Japanese Manhole Cover via Kuriositas

The Art of the Japanese Manhole Cover via Kuriositas

Mix it up with OK Go! Then, come color with the new “OK Go Color” game at Sesame Street

"David Choe was paid in Facebook stock for paintings at the company’s first headquarters. His payout may be $200 million when it goes public. Some investors may make billions of dollars…" via the NYT

"David Choe was paid in Facebook stock for paintings at the company’s first headquarters. His payout may be $200 million when it goes public. Some investors may make billions of dollars…" via the NYT

Inch By Inch


lareviewofbooks:

MORT PERSKY

on the art of the newspaper column.

Photograph by Ralph Schoenstein

John Avlon, Jesse Angelo, and Errol Louis
Deadline Artists: America’s Greatest Newspaper Columnists

Overlook Press, September 2011. 432 pp.

A mere 60 years ago, at the front end of my love-hate affair with the published word, I went to work for my first “real” newspaper, an actual evening daily willing to pay a salary-like sum for my dubious services. The paper was the Herald in Augusta, Georgia. It subscribed to a feature service called NEA, which sold columns and other stories in a one-price package deal that the Herald and many other papers seemed to find irresistible. Unlike its à la carte rivals, whose wares were typesetter-ready, NEA delivered its viands neatly laid out on printed pages that made them look more attractive to editors.



That extra dash of typography meant somebody had to clip the stories chosen for print and paste them onto sheets of copy paper — a quaint necessity of the day — before writing a headline and sending the lot to the composing room, there to be set in type once again.



That somebody — often me — could be counted on to have scissors, rubber-cement pot, and a deskload of soft-leaded, blacker-than-Hitler’s-heart No. 2 copy pencils at the ready. Which is how I came to be thus accessorized for my first meeting with the work of James Earl Breslin Jr., whose writing accounted for roughly half of the most interesting stories in NEA’s sports section, the Green Sheet. I had no reason to wonder about the fellow’s age then, and besides, he was in New York and I was in Augusta. Had I known he was 23, but a couple of years older than I was when I was while gluing down his columns for the linotype operators, I might well have considered dropping out of the game then and there.

Jimmy, you see, had already fast-tracked himself into a job that required more than mere reporting and promised greater rewards. He was very nearly a columnist already, all but freed from the tedious requirements of “objectivity.” In Deadline Artists: America’s Greatest Newspaper Columnists, a new and important anthology, the great Russell Baker describes it this way: The objectivity code “forbade a reporter to write of, say, Senator Blattis: ‘Lying as usual, Senator Blattis declared today …’” Baker concluded, “This obligation to assist in dignifying inferior men … made you feel as though you were nothing more than a megaphone for the convenience of frauds.”

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(Source: lareviewofbooks)

streetartsf:

Almost missed the obvious.
Haight @Shrader Street in San Francisco, CA.

streetartsf:

Almost missed the obvious.

Haight @Shrader Street in San Francisco, CA.

"The Impressionist Landscape" 1897 via imprint

"The Impressionist Landscape" 1897 via imprint

Felix Salmon: How Sharing Disrupts Media


"…Reblogging, on Tumblr, is so easy that the vast majority of Tumblr sites actually create little or no original content: they just republish content from other people. That’s a wonderful thing, for two reasons. Firstly, it takes people who are shy about (or just not very good at) creating their own content, and gives them a great way to express themselves online. (As Arianna Huffington says, “self-expression is the new entertainment”.) And secondly, it acts as a natural amplifier for the people who do create original content — the average post on Tumblr gets reblogged nine times, and therefore reaches vastly more people than if it just sat on its original site waiting to be discovered by people visiting it directly…"

Alex Gross’ scifi cabinet cards via iO9, via his website

Alex Gross’ scifi cabinet cards via iO9, via his website

"Monica Cook 01" with thanks to Gawker (artist website here)

italianrenaissance:

Photo Merisoniom

italianrenaissance:

Photo Merisoniom

(Source: , via artdetails)

Blitz, who earned his keep

Blitz, who earned his keep

novocainelipstick:

Vintage Disneyland Valentines (1959)

(via vintagegal)

from The Dreams of Dr. Plague (Japan 1924) via 50 Watts

from The Dreams of Dr. Plague (Japan 1924) via 50 Watts

Go S-Car go!

Go S-Car go!